Featured Free Reporting:
12 Ways to Boost Workplace Safety
Download this Special Report
Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Chemical Safety

Today’s workplace uses thousands of chemicals, many of which are hazardous. The resources in this section will help guide you in the safe and legal identification, storage, transport, and use of these chemicals, and in making sure that your employees right to know how to be safe around such substances is provided, as required by law.

Free Special Report: Does Your PPE Program Meet OSHA’s Requirements?


A Label for All Seasons … and All Situations

In yesterday’s article, we looked at the labeling requirements for solid materials, specifically, when a solid material is an “article” that does not require labeling and when it is a potentially hazardous chemical that must be labeled. Today, we’ll look at other unusual labeling situations that may arise and how to handle them.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Put Your Stamp on These Unusual Labeling Situations

When we think of chemical labeling, we tend to think of “ordinary” situations—gallon jars of sulfuric acid sporting OSHA’s new pictograms, or bags of insulation with their hazard labels prominently displayed. But hazardous chemicals don’t always come in what we think of as “ordinary” containers, nor do they stay there—they are, after all, intended for use. How should you address labeling under these unusual circumstances?

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Methylene Chloride: Protecting Exposed Workers

Yesterday we looked at the hazards of methylene chloride, a common paint-stripping chemical with many industrial uses—and many hazards, including cancer. Today, let’s talk about how to protect workers from exposure to this narcotic, corrosive, carcinogenic chemical.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Stripping Away the Hazards of Methylene Chloride

Methylene chloride (also called dichloromethane) is a solvent with many uses, including paint stripping, polyurethane foam manufacturing, and cleaning and degreasing. You might not think that a chemical you can buy at your local home improvement store for use at home would be all that dangerous, but don’t be fooled. Methylene chloride is hazardous enough that it is covered by one of OSHA’s substance-specific standards, 29 CFR 1910.1052.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Your HAZWOPER Chain of Command Is Only As Strong As Its Weakest Link

Yesterday, we looked at the six essential elements of a HAZWOPER site analysis. Today, we’ll look at the requirements for site management and site control.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Six Essential Components of HAZWOPER Site Analysis

If you’re in charge of a HAZWOPER site, there are site-related duties and responsibilities you need to be aware of. These include site characterization and analysis, establishing a chain of command, and site control.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Gas Detection: Hydrogen Sulfide Hazards and Releases

Hydrogen sulfide, or sour gas, is a flammable, colorless gas that is toxic at extremely low concentrations. It is heavier than air, and may accumulate in low-lying areas. It smells like “rotten eggs” at low concentrations and causes workers to quickly lose their sense of smell.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Gas Detection: Special Precautions for Hydrogen Sulfide

Hydrogen sulfide gas is very corrosive and therefore extremely hazardous. You need to take special precautions when choosing equipment and establishing safe work procedures.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Common HazCom Mistakes and Tips for Compliance

Hazard communication often figures prominently on OSHA’s annual Top 10 Violations list. Find out why so many employers fall short of HazCom requirements.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Responding to Chemical Spills: First Critical Actions

Taking immediate action after a chemical spill has been identified can prevent worker injuries and environmental damage.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE