Featured Free Reporting:
12 Ways to Boost Workplace Safety
Download this Special Report
Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Archives

Hispanic and Latino Workers at Risk, Part II: Safety Training Tips

Many Hispanic and Latino workers are insufficiently trained in the hazards of their jobs and in safe work practices. This can happen even in workplaces where training schedules and outlines are rigorously adhered to, if employers fail to recognize the severity of the barrier posed by limited English proficiency. Even a worker who speaks English well enough to communicate with coworkers on a day-to-day basis may not be fluent enough to adequately comprehend training and informational materials that are provided in English.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Hispanic and Latino Workers at Risk; Can You Protect Them?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) convened a National Action Summit for Latino Worker Health and Safety in April 2010. The Agency has reached out to Hispanic and Latino workers since that time, attempting to reduce their high rates of work-related injuries and fatalities, but there is little to show for its efforts. The preliminary results of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Summary for 2013, released in September, show that fatal work injuries among Hispanic and Latino workers increased by 7% over 2012 figures—the only ethnic groups to show such an increase.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Sleuthing Out Safe Disability Accommodations: Identifying a “Direct Threat”

There may be a point at which a worker cannot do a job safely because of a disability. A worker with an intellectual disability will probably never be qualified to run heavy machinery. But how can you determine when a worker and a job combine to create a significant risk of substantial harm to the worker or to others? How can you determine what those jobs and conditions might be?

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

The Case of the Color-blind Electrician: Sleuthing Out Safe Disability Accommodations

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, employers have to provide reasonable accommodations for workers with disabilities—but what about cases where the worker’s disability affects his safety or the safety of others? Are there really reasonable accommodations that can solve these vexing cases?

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

An Internship of Olympic Proportions!

Today’s Advisor reports on one journalism student’s internship at the recent Sochi Winter Olympics. It’s a great example of how internships—in any industry—can provide exciting and effective on-the-job training that helps prepare the next generation of your workforce.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Facing a Real Fire: Are Your Workers Prepared

In yesterday’s article, we looked at a few situations that can arise in a real fire that you might be overlooking in your fire safety training. Today, we’ll look at two more possibilities your employees need to be prepared to face, and what you can do to keep your fire safety preparation real.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Do Your Fire Drills Resemble Reality?

What did your last fire drill look and sound like? Was it a calm and quickly executed affair: The fire alarm sounded and everybody calmly walked out through their nearest exit and went to the assembly point? Congratulations: Your workers know how to get out of the building when there’s not actually a fire. During a real fire situation, though, they might not do so well. Here’s some advice you can use to help workers prepare for a real fire.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

A Label for All Seasons … and All Situations

In yesterday’s article, we looked at the labeling requirements for solid materials, specifically, when a solid material is an “article” that does not require labeling and when it is a potentially hazardous chemical that must be labeled. Today, we’ll look at other unusual labeling situations that may arise and how to handle them.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Put Your Stamp on These Unusual Labeling Situations

When we think of chemical labeling, we tend to think of “ordinary” situations—gallon jars of sulfuric acid sporting OSHA’s new pictograms, or bags of insulation with their hazard labels prominently displayed. But hazardous chemicals don’t always come in what we think of as “ordinary” containers, nor do they stay there—they are, after all, intended for use. How should you address labeling under these unusual circumstances?

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Keep An Eye on Safety Training

One way to open your training session is with the eye-opening statistics given in the “Why It Matters” section! Also inform trainees that the top 5 industries for eye injuries are:

SHARE THIS ARTICLE