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Employers Get 3-Year Extension on Crane Operator Certification—but not on Training Requirements

Just ahead of its original deadline for the certification of crane operators under the 2010 final rule on Cranes and Derricks in Construction, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has offered employers and crane operators a break. In a rule finalized on September 25, 2014, the Agency has extended the deadline for operator certification from November 10, 2014, three full years, to November 10, 2017. But, the Agency emphasized, the certification requirement is separate from the training requirements under the standard. Employers must still provide training to crane operators.

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Tree Trimming Training

A tree-trimming accident leads to a fatality—and a reconsideration of safety training for outdoor work. Today’s Advisor reports on the accident and reiterates OSHA’s safety recommendations for tree-trimming activities.

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Beyond the Form 300: More Metrics for Your Safety Program

Yesterday, we looked beyond using recordable injuries, illnesses, and workers’ compensation claims as ways to evaluate the effectiveness of your safety program, finding numerical ways to evaluate safety communication in the workplace. Today, we’ll look at three more metrics you can measure that go beyond the Form 300 in giving you information about how your safety program is doing.

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Taking the Measure of Your Safety Program through Safety Communication

Is your safety program working? How do you know? Tracking injuries, illnesses, and workers’ compensation claims is a good start, but there are other indicators that can give you a broader, deeper, clearer picture of how your safety program is functioning.

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Are You Bad? Watch Out, Because OSHA’s Going Nationwide

Yesterday, we looked at the changes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) reporting requirements that will go into effect on January 1, 2015. But that’s not the only change OSHA has recently made that will affect its enforcement efforts—and not all of the changes have been announced in a press release.

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OSHA Continues to Fine-Tune Enforcement with New Reporting Requirements

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has changed its rules about when employers must report a work-related injury directly to the agency, and it has also updated its list of industries that are categorically exempt from injury and illness recordkeeping. The new rule was published in September and goes into effect on January 1, 2015.

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Survey Says: Some Workers Willing to Pay for Training

Today’s Advisor reports on the results of a recent survey on the value of training in the workplace.

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Hispanic and Latino Workers at Risk, Part II: Safety Training Tips

Many Hispanic and Latino workers are insufficiently trained in the hazards of their jobs and in safe work practices. This can happen even in workplaces where training schedules and outlines are rigorously adhered to, if employers fail to recognize the severity of the barrier posed by limited English proficiency. Even a worker who speaks English well enough to communicate with coworkers on a day-to-day basis may not be fluent enough to adequately comprehend training and informational materials that are provided in English.

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Hispanic and Latino Workers at Risk; Can You Protect Them?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) convened a National Action Summit for Latino Worker Health and Safety in April 2010. The Agency has reached out to Hispanic and Latino workers since that time, attempting to reduce their high rates of work-related injuries and fatalities, but there is little to show for its efforts. The preliminary results of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Summary for 2013, released in September, show that fatal work injuries among Hispanic and Latino workers increased by 7% over 2012 figures—the only ethnic groups to show such an increase.

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Sleuthing Out Safe Disability Accommodations: Identifying a “Direct Threat”

There may be a point at which a worker cannot do a job safely because of a disability. A worker with an intellectual disability will probably never be qualified to run heavy machinery. But how can you determine when a worker and a job combine to create a significant risk of substantial harm to the worker or to others? How can you determine what those jobs and conditions might be?

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