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Fire Drills Aren’t Just for Fun

October 5 to 11 is National Fire Prevention Week (www.nfpa.org/safety-information/fire-prevention-week). Inspire your employees to participate in fire drill training by sharing the news about how a failure to train and drill on evacuation routes earned Hawaii companies large fines.

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Cite Me Twice, Shame on Me

Sometimes it’s difficult to get a problem cleared up around your workplace. Even when OSHA cites a condition, you may have difficulty tracking it down at all of your facilities or bringing all of your equipment up to standard. It’s important to try, though—if you don’t, you could be cited for either a “repeat” violation or for a “failure to abate” violation. Here’s why you want to avoid being cited twice for the same problem.

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Don’t Get the Same Citation Twice

Despite your best efforts, there’s probably something in your workplace right now that an OSHA inspector could cite. Maybe it was lower on your list of priorities, or maybe it was just something that you had missed—but the important thing, once it’s cited, is to get it taken care of quickly. Always move a cited issue to the top of your to-do list. If you don’t, you run the risk of being cited again for the same violation.

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Methylene Chloride: Protecting Exposed Workers

Yesterday we looked at the hazards of methylene chloride, a common paint-stripping chemical with many industrial uses—and many hazards, including cancer. Today, let’s talk about how to protect workers from exposure to this narcotic, corrosive, carcinogenic chemical.

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Stripping Away the Hazards of Methylene Chloride

Methylene chloride (also called dichloromethane) is a solvent with many uses, including paint stripping, polyurethane foam manufacturing, and cleaning and degreasing. You might not think that a chemical you can buy at your local home improvement store for use at home would be all that dangerous, but don’t be fooled. Methylene chloride is hazardous enough that it is covered by one of OSHA’s substance-specific standards, 29 CFR 1910.1052.

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Expert Advice on E-Learning

Today’s Advisor gets expert answers to these questions: What are some common problems that can derail e-learning projects, and what can safety trainers do to address those problems?

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Grow Your Network, Grow Your Career

Yesterday’s Advisor looked at some of the professions on the periphery of workplace safety who might have enough in common with safety professionals to feel like true colleagues, and who might help improve your job performance. When you improve your performance, you improve your career.

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Finding Someone to “Talk Shop” with, in a Safety Department of One

Occupational safety can be a lonely profession. Many safety professionals are a department of one, laboring alone in an area many other professionals don’t really understand. So, outside the occasional conference or lunch with your counterpart from a different company, where does an EHS professional find someone to “talk shop” with?

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Build a Better Retraining Program with These Three R’s

In yesterday’s Advisor, we looked at three ways to make sure that your introductory training works for your workforce. But training is never a one-and-done proposition. Build a training program that continually reinforces your safety message with three more fundamental strategies.

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Build Better Introductory Training Sessions Using These Three R’s

Do you sometimes feel like your training sessions have become a dog and pony show, requiring you to play the manic comedian in order to keep your trainees engaged and interested? Maybe you’re working too hard. Here’s what your workers really need from your training sessions.

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